The Morning Roundup: Raleigh Father of Seven Faces Deportation, the Never-Ending HB 2 Saga Continues | News

The Morning Roundup: Raleigh Father of Seven Faces Deportation, the Never-Ending HB 2 Saga Continues

by

comment
screen_shot_2017-03-29_at_8.53.45_am.png
The week is halfway home. Let's dig in.

1) NCAA makes threat re: HB 2. GOP agrees to "deal." Governor says there was no deal.

The NCAA threw down the gauntlet Tuesday morning—telling the legislature it had forty-eight hours to kill HB 2 unless it wanted to lose hosting rights to all NCAA championships through 2022. Things got pretty crazy after that.

Senate leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore held a press conference to announce they agreed, "in principle," with a compromise offered by Governor Cooper. There's just one catch. Cooper denies ever formally offering a deal.

Here's where things got weird. Berger and Moore released a batch of emails they say proves a deal was in the works. Take a peep:

In short, there's no deal. Still.

2) A vigil is planned in Raleigh tonight for a father of seven facing deportation.

The community is rallying behind a Raleigh man who is facing deportation for missing a court date involving a minor traffic violation. Click here for the details.

Community members will host a vigil tonight for Vicente Marcial Noyola, a local father of seven U.S. citizen children who is currently being held at the Wake County Detention Center.

Noyola was detained on March 7 after failing to appear in court for driving with a revoked license, according to the advocacy group Alerta Migratoria. Although they say Noyola didn't know he was supposed to go to court, police nabbed him in front of his children before they headed to school that morning, armed with a warrant for his arrest.

"We saw all of it, me and my brothers, we saw it," his eight-year-old daughter, Crystal, told the INDY. "I was scared and shy. I was crying. I want him to stay with us, and if he gets deported, he won't get to see us anymore. And me and my brother, we might get sick."

Noyola is the primary caretaker for his seven children, ranging in age from five to twenty-one. Without their father around, his oldest children have had to step in—and will likely have to do so again should the deportation proceed.

3) Trump all but ensures the U.S. will fail to meet its Paris Agreement pledge.

Another executive order. This one doesn't take a shot at immigrants or refugees, but rather the planet. From The New York Times:
During his first two months in office, President Donald J. Trump has rolled back key Obama-era greenhouse gas regulations. Without these rules in place, the United States is set to fall far short of its 2015 Paris Agreement pledge: to lower emissions by at least 26 percent below 2005 levels by 2025.
The news doesn't get better from there.
In an executive order released Tuesday, Mr. Trump instructed the Environmental Protection Agency to reverse course on the Obama administration’s biggest climate change policy, the Clean Power Plan, which aimed to cut emissions from existing coal- and gas-fired power plants.

If implemented to its fullest extent, the plan would have reduced carbon emissions by nearly 650 megatons by 2025 – just under halfway to the Paris pledge, according to an analysis by Climate Interactive.
4) Brexit is official.

Notice has been given. Again, from the Times:
In one of the most consequential diplomatic events in Britain since World War II, Prime Minister Theresa May on Wednesday sent formal notice of the country’s intention to withdraw from the European Union, starting a tortuous two-year divorce littered with pitfalls for both sides.

Speaking in Parliament, Mrs. May said she was invoking Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, putting Britain on track to leave the European Union in 2019 and raising a host of thorny issues involved in untangling a four-decade relationship.

In addition to a welter of trade and customs matters, the Conservative government faces the prospect of a new independence referendum in Scotland, where a majority voted to remain in the European Union, and deep worries about the 1998 Good Friday peace agreement in Northern Ireland.
Check out some of the stories that published in today's INDY:

Erica Hellerstein tackles the repercussions of an Obamacare repeal.
Durham's DA decides to not prosecute the cop who shot Frank Clark.
Garner apartment complex residents get more time after receiving eviction notice.

That's all for today.


Add a comment