"The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro" Reading | Carrboro Century Center | Page: Literary Related, Holidays | Indy Week

Page: Literary Related, Holidays

"The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro" Reading

When: Sat., July 4, 12 p.m. 2015

THE MEANING OF JULY FOURTH FOR THE NEGRO

CARRBORO CENTURY CENTER, CARRBORO

SATURDAY, JULY 4

"This Fourth July is yours, not mine," Frederick Douglass told an audience in Rochester, New York, at an 1852 commemoration of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. "You may rejoice, I must mourn." The speech was published in a booklet that still stands as a classic of abolitionist literature. Douglass' praise for the justness of the revolutionary impulse on which the country was founded, which his audience could easily agree with, was an ironclad rhetorical frame for the condemnation of American slavery to follow. The Charleston massacre is the latest stark reminder that Douglass' words are far from historical relics, 150 years after the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment. As part of an Independence Day celebration that also includes a parade from Weaver Street Market to Town Hall, the Town of Carrboro stages its second annual community reading of Douglass' The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro at the Carrboro Century Center. Before the cookouts and fireworks, listen to these incantatory questions about the parity of American freedom, which still await definitive answers. Noon–1:30 p.m., free,

100 N. Greensboro St., Carrboro, 919-918-7392,

www.townofcarrboro.org.Brian Howe

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