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Get Out

Music worth leaving the house to hear this week

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SpencerAcuff
Cat's Cradle
Friday, Nov. 5

Although it sounds like it might be one of those new country bands with two cowboy-hatted frontmen drawling and bawling about dawgs and pickups, Chapel Hill's SpencerAcuff leans toward the Americana persuasion. Promising no "trite pop crap" in their sound, David Spencer and Will Acuff lead the quartet whose most intriguing label is "the all-male Indigo Girls." Roman Candle and Bain Mattox open. --GB

Yo Mama's Big Fat Booty Band
Local 506
Friday, Nov. 5

Boone boys come down from the mountain to get in yo' face. Actually, they're from all over the place, but this seven-piece platter of greasy funk hangs their hats in Boone when they get through funkin' the joint up with their own brand of rump shakin' musical mischief. Honorary voyagers on the Mothership, the boys earned intergalactic frequent flyer miles playing a party for George Clinton's P-Funk Allstars, flashing their dreadlock style between flinging buckets of funk at the intergalactic space travelers. --GB

Wrangler Brutes
Kings
Friday, Nov. 5

Sam McPheeters led one of hardcore punk's seminal acts, Born Against, and he brings the same uncompromising cynicism and rumble to his new band, Wrangler Brutes. Over a driving old-school sound that recalls early Black Flag and Dead Kennedys, McPheeters unleashes amusing invective that assails the price of gas ("$45"), imagines prison violence striking white collar haunts ("Shank'd") and suggests "the universe is unforgivingly complex, but the least you could do is fake some perspective."--CP

Third World, Keith Hurlock
Lincoln Theatre
Friday, Nov. 5

Back in 1974, classically trained cellist and guitarist Stephen "Cat" Coore co-founded Third World outside of Kingston. Thirty years later and after collaborations with Cindy Lauper, Maxi Priest and Sly & Robbie, The Cat with the inimitable fashion sense is still at it, serving crossover crew, dread-locked magic that has always openly been more content with infusing hip hop, R&B, funk and rock into its music as an avenue to stateside chart success rather than sticking to traditional reggae forms and sets. If you've heard "Dancin' on the Floor (Hooked on Love)" or "96 Degrees in the Shade," you know Third World. --GC

Stolie, Scotty Phillips
Bickett Gallery
Friday, Nov. 5

Not to be confused with the Vodka or with just another girl with a guitar, Chicago's mid-20s chanteuse Stolie boasts a record collection as wide and inclusive as her stylistic comfort zones. She plays on a white-girl soul with an electronics-on-ice vibe one moment, while sliding naturally into tight, Indigo-shaded harmonies the next. The latter proclivity finds her at her best, though, painting city-framed vignettes of love inside of a kiss on "Skin," just as well as, say, Laura's Veirs or Cantrell. Just don't expect Cat Power, Lucinda Williams or Sade to be checking their rearview mirrors anytime soon. --GC

The Forty-Fives, The Spinns
The Cave
Saturday, Nov. 6

Atlanta troublemakers The Forty-Fives have just released High Life High Volume on Yep Roc and have been making the rounds, including an appearance earlier this year on the late John Peel's radio show. WXYC 10 Years of Webcasting Anniversary Party, Local 506, Saturday, Nov. 6 In the right hands, technology is often a good thing. College radio is even more often a good thing. On Nov. 7, 1994, the two came together when UNC-Chapel Hill's WXYC became the first radio station in the world to stream its signal over the Web 24 hours a day. To celebrate that moment, WXYC is throwing a party featuring music from eNtet, the Moaners, Spectac and Jett Rink, all of whom appear on the new Bandwidth compilation, which will be available for free download on the WXYC Web site beginning Nov. 7. --RC

Rebecca & the Hi-Tones
Blue Bayou
Saturday, Nov. 6

For the last 20 years, Durham's Rebbeca & the Hi-Tones have put the oomph in big band music, jazz and homewreckin' R&B. No stuffy re-creationists, Rebecca and her group make the music of the past seem as lively and interesting as anything you're likely to hear from the current crop of noise makers. The expandable aggregation usually weighs in at about eight pieces, but always sounds like a herd of houserockers. And if you like to dance, well godawmighty, man, don't just stand there gawkin', take off your shoes, grab a partner and get to work. --GB

David Childers & the Modern Don Juans, Jostle Lee
The Pour House
Sunday, Nov. 7

Mount Holly, NC's David Childers, a rocker whose songs reveal a poet's eye for detail and a true-country artist's sense of drama, continues to earn fans one at a time. The latest: The Pour House's Marianne Taylor, who upon hearing Childers' latest album Room #23 for the first time, picked up the phone and booked him on the spot, and the Gourds' Kev Russell, who joined the converted after Childers & the Modern Don Juans opened a recent Gourds show. The show starts at 7 p.m. --RC

Deerhoof
Local 506
Sunday, Nov. 7

Chaotic and sweet like a teenage girl's affections, Deerhoof's mix of quirky herky-jerky rhythms, spastic guitar experimentalism and gooey hooks sounds like Dismemberment Plan in a fender-bender with Shonen Knife. Singer/bassist Satomi Matsuzaki offers tender, child-like vocals that recall the Japanese trio, while the music has a swervy, disjunctive jazzy sway, which early in their career was prone to spates of noise-mongering. The past couple albums have witnessed a decline in atonality in favor of more supple, off-beat melodic nuggets that are as shiny and complex as the interior of a geode. --CP

Robert Earl Keen
Cat's Cradle
Sunday, Nov. 7

"My idea about this whole business is to have some fun and create some kind of challenge and see if I can pull it off," says Robert Earl Keen. "The last album I made, Farm Fresh Onions, is like, look, I just want to have as much fun as possible. And if it gets to be boring or tedious, I don't want to do it." Keen's music has been described as country music for people who hate country music, but a better description might be the comfortable rhythms of a man who's used to taking his time to get his point across. But Keen's not real picky. "Country rock works about as good as anything," the singer says, " 'cause at least it sounds like it might be fun and energetic."--GB

Galactic, Drums & Tuba, Amp Fiddler
Lincoln Theatre
Tuesday, Nov. 9

Last year, Galactic looked off at the Lincoln Theatre, despite having just released their most innovative studio outing to date, Ruckus. Expect them to be back on their game for this one. Electronic tinkering and a powerhouse improvisational unit backed by one of the nation's most playful drummers. --GC

Matt Pond PA
Local 506
Tuesday, Nov. 9

Joining the chamber pop renaissance of the millennium, Pond leans more to the Pernice Brothers than The Flaming Lips or Belle & Sebastian side of the spectrum--which is to say there's a kind of rustic lope to the tracks and a less refined approach to the orchestration. Matt Pond has a light jangle pop bounce and college rock melodicism for which the cello and strings provide ballast as opposed to a lush blanket of orchestral warmth. --CP

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