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Get Out

Music worth leaving the house to hear this week

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Jesse Malin, The Damnwells
Go! Room 4
Wednesday, July 28

Brooklyn's The Damnwells pick up where The Replacements left off a decade or so ago, playing highly amped, sing-your-heart-out country songs with rock instruments, something like a starry-eyed Whiskeytown with a late-night-PBR-and-Uncle Tupelo hangover. That is understandable, of course, since ex-Whiskeytowner Steven Terry beats for the bunch. Speaking of Whiskeytown, Ryan Adams produced The Fine Art of Self-Destruction, the debut from headliner and former D-Generation frontman Jesse Malin. His rough-and-tumble style captures the inner-city grit with narrative, true-to-life streetscapes like "Riding on the Subway."--Grayson Currin

Merge Records 15th Anniversary Celebration Pre-Show: Lou Barlow, Arcade Fire
Local 506
Wednesday, July 28

It's been a strange road for Barlow since indie rock icons Sebadoh went on hiatus in 1999. Barlow penned the hit "Natural One" with John Davis as Folk Implosion and garnered a major label deal. But Davis went AWOL on a subsequent tour, scotching the deal and forcing Barlow to regroup. A new lineup of Folk Implosion was convened and recorded a full-on rock album, dispensing with much of Barlow's off-kilter pop charms. But Barlow will release his first "proper" solo album on Merge this fall. A versatile artist, Barlow's songs are extraordinary for their emotion, honesty and directness. This show is free. Canada's Arcade Fire has a debut CD coming out on Merge this fall. If you're not a member, be sure to pick up a 506 membership ahead of the show. --Chris Parker

Black Socks/Phon, Ticonderoga, Art Lord and His Self Portraits
Kings
Thursday, July 29

If you're not able to make it to Merge Fest Part One because of that whole sold-out predicament, this is the most promising alternative. Phon, an experimental duo with Kranky-like drone technique, will collaborate with STRANGE's Vince Carmody, who carves a melodic electronica aesthetic from chiming keyboards and scatterbrained beats. Ticonderoga is quickly becoming one of the Capital City's best, essentially taking folk songs overflowing with imagery (think Cub Country and Wilco) and contorting post-rock life into them. Greenville's Art Lord dances its way to Substance. --Grayson Currin

Cary Hudson
The Cave
Thursday, July 29

In Blue Mountain, and before that in the Hilltops (both with then-wife Laurie Stirrat), Oxford, Mississippi's Cary Hudson made some of the grittiest and best roots-rock of the early alt.country days. Post-Blue Mountain and post-marriage, Hudson is making music that's even rawer, driven by slide guitar that can't decide whether it wants to steal souls or slice 'em in two. --Rick Cornell

Starlite Desperation
Go! Room 4
Thursday, July 29

The lovable thing about Detroit-by-way-of-Monterey garage rockers Starlite Desperation is their sly stylish groove, and singer Dante Adrian-White's crooning resemblance to Gun Club's Jeffrey Lee Pierce. The crisp, ringing guitar tones channel the spirit of Television, and there's a self-conscious cool that could be The Hollies. Mostly, though, this is old-fashioned bar room garage that's content not to overload the amps, but instead dose up on attitude and a sneering bar-closing vibe. --Chris Parker

Thursday, Your Enemies Friends, Codeseven, Classic Case
Lincoln Theatre
Friday, July 30

Thursday made the jump from Chicago indie Victory to Island Records along with other post-core acts like Thrice and The Used because they sound like other post-core acts: crushing tempos, anguished angst-ridden lyricism and a dramatic presentation built around snaking guitar lines and touches of piano or electronics. Openers Your Enemies Friends sound a lot like fellow L.A. dark, hard rocking punkers Icarus Line. Rough, brooding, aggressive music. --Chris Parker

Sarah McLachlan, Butterfly Boucher
RBC Center
Friday, July 30

McLachlan's is the angelic voice that launched a thousand careers, from DJ Tiesto to Paula Cole and scores of imitators. Her atmospheric folk-pop sound became an adult contemporary template since the release of her 1993 album Fumbling Toward Ecstasy, but she's released just two albums since, neither expanding nor straying much from the original blueprint. Opener Butterfly Boucher's debut, Flutterby, is an astoundingly mature work with more ideas in forty minutes than Avril Lavigne's had in twenty years. Sometimes they bump into each other, but Boucher also displays a fine voice and spunky spirit. --Chris Parker

The Olympic Ass Kickin' Team, The Cartridge Family
Martin Street
Saturday, July 31

One of Terry Anderson's greatest musical moments was meeting The Faces' Ian McLagan. Electric piano-pounding Greg Rice is the Triangle's version of Ian McLagan. That's more than enough to make Anderson's Olympic Ass Kickin' Team and Rice's Cartridge Family a good pairing. --Rick Cornell

Mosadi Music
The Pour House
Saturday, July 31

First, a look at who's in this soul troupe of jazz players: Nic Slaton is one of the Triangle's best bassists, cutting a constant groove while smothering it with embellishments; guitarist Chris Boerner uses nearly a dozen pedals to render his mature acid jazz, laid back one verse and roaring out of the next; Steven Levitan is The Apple Juice Kid, a hyperactive drummer with a propensity for electronics and a Stanton Moore thunder. They bring it together in a socially conscious groove led by poet/rapper/chanteuse Shirlette Ammons, a dread-locked activist with a charm matched only by her honey flow. --Grayson Currin

Oteil & The Peacemakers, Go There
Lincoln Theatre
Sunday, August 1

Thank your tax dollars for the astounding Burbridge boys: graduates of North Carolina public schools, Kofi blazes on the flute and keys with The Derek Trucks Band, while Oteil has been slapping bass with Aquarium Rescue Unit, The Allman Brothers Band and his own Peacemakers for years. Jazz guitarist Scott Sawyer is in the midst of a two-month residency at The Pour House, inviting local crackerjacks to sit in on blazing originals and imaginative covers of standards from Glen Campbell to Charlie Parker. Catch him with Go There, a superb trio featuring Kenny Soule and Bobby Patterson. --Grayson Currin

Cex, Make Believe
Go! Room 4
Tuesday, August 3

Bedroom computer jockey Rjyan Kidwell, aka Cex, has presided over an array of approaches, from drill'n'bass echoing Aphex Twin and Autechre to tongue-in-cheek electro-pop to old school hip hop (2002's Tall, Dark & Handcuffed) and finally this year's Maryland Mansions, which offers his warped take on NIN-style industrial. A conscious iconoclast who would zig if you said zag, Kidwell's live shows are a hoot, a Romper Room-style adolescent joy ride full of twisted humor and general goofiness. Openers Make Believe feature Cap'n Jazz/Joan of Arc leader Tim Kinsella along with Owls guitarist Sam Zurick creating a tightly-wound, semi-skronk emo/math-rock hybrid of jagged corners and caterwauls. --Chris Parker

Greendale Premiere
Kings
Tuesday, August 3

From his pioneering work in making Farm Aid one of America' biggest benefits to his frontiersman resonance from pure folk to pure noise experimentation, Neil Young has always been adventurous. 2003's Greendale, the most sprawling film yet directed by Young under the Bernard Shakey pseudonym, is no exception, as Young spends nearly 90 minutes launching a uniform, brutal assault on American trade and environmental policies. It's certainly a pretentious film, but it's a telling glimpse into the drive of an already accomplished artist who, like rust, never sleeps. --Grayson Currin

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