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Mixed media
In his story, "Split Decision," [April 10] David Fellerath reports on the DoubleTake Documentary Film Festival's change in moniker to Full Frame Documentary Film Festival. Regardless of the reason for the change, I find the new name curious and mildly irritating. I understand the intended metaphor, with its intention to present "the truth in all its myriad aspects," but it grates my technical sensibilities as a photographer and filmmaker.

The term "full frame" has almost no meaning when applied to the medium of motion picture. For the most part, post-production image cropping is rarely employed during the process of filmmaking. Cinematographers work with the assumption that composition is a task to be completed from behind the viewfinder. So in a sense, all films are "full frame." On the other hand, projectors never project the entire frame, hence no film is ever actually presented in "full frame."

Still photography is another story. Full frame photography actually has meaning as a technical, aesthetic and philosophical term. In the print medium, photographers often edit their in-camera compositions in the darkroom. Some photographers eschew this practice and challenge themselves to make the final decision while holding their cameras. Often full frame photographers print a bit of the unexposed film along with the image, which creates a black border to frame the composition. A photographer friend of mine once described the power of this border with its philosophical and visual appeal. He said that when viewing a full frame photograph, one can "see around the black lines into a wider world."
--G.D. VUNCANNON, DURHAM

N.C. needs PR
I'm in the fifth grade at Neil Hafley School in Monteca, Calif. I have adopted your state for my class project. I will be doing a report and making a display about North Carolina. In May, my class will be having a "State Fair." I will display and show everything I have gotten and learned about your state to my whole school.

It would be helpful to me if you could ask your readers to send me postcards of your state, maps, brochures, information about wildlife, industry, neat places to visit, statistics, sports teams and any information and items your readers feel would be helpful.

I hope your readers will help me with this project. I'm looking forward to hearing from them, and promise to send a thank you note to them for helping me. I'm excited about learning about your state.
--BRITTNEE NICOLE DESOUZA, MANTECA, CALIF.

Editors' Note: Send items to Brittnee Desouza c/o Mrs. Teicheiara's Class, Neil Hafley School, 849 Northgate Drive, Manteca, Calif., 95336.

Rhyme and reason
Get it? I don't.

I tried I really did. I read the gold, silver and bronze "poems" several times each [Independent Poetry Contest, March 27]. But I just didn't get it. Was this a poetry contest or a story contest? Is it uncool to write poetry that rhymes? I understand that poetry doesn't have to rhyme, yet what skill does it take to write an unrhyming rhyme?

Maybe you should have two "poetry" contests. One for those who can create rhythmic, rhyming stories and one for those who can't.

Maybe you could publish all the entries and let the entrants and readers vote.

That reminds me of a question I have for you. How many entries did you receive and how much money did you make?

Take the poetry away from some bodingled Duke English professor and give it to the artists themselves, they are much more in touch.

Here's one for you:

The light turned red.
The sun is hot.
I watch the curves,
They are never straight.

Get it? I don't.
--BOB WILLIAMSON, WAKE FOREST

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