Was your home once a meth lab? | News | Indy Week

Was your home once a meth lab?

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Ooh, what's that smell? Has there been more than mac 'n' cheese cooking on your stove?

The problem with meth labs—in addition to their tendency to explode—is that they leave hazardous chemical residue in the home. Unsuspecting new tenants or homeowners may live in the house with contaminants in the walls, appliances, plumbing, etc. Common household chemicals used in meth recipes are methanol, ether, benzene, methylene chloride, trichloroethane and toluene. Exposure to benzene, for example, increases your risk of leukemia.

To find out if your home is a former methamphetamine lab, check the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's National Clandestine Laboratory Register. Labs are listed by state and county. Here's the PDF for North Carolina, and addresses in local counties are listed below.

Chatham County

  • 50 ALLEN POND ROAD, BEAR CREEK (9/8/2007)
  • 155 SILK HOPE GUM SPRINGS ROAD, PITTSBORO (12/16/2004)
  • 576 ┬áLAURA JOHNSON ROAD, PITTSBORO (5/21/2009)

Durham County

  • 810 SOUTH MINERAL SPRINGS ROAD, DURHAM (6/3/2011)

Wake County

  • 116 PINE STREET A, FUQUAY-VARINA (6/9/2010)
  • 1504 CRANSTON ROAD, GARNER (2/23/2006)
  • 4605 BROCKTON DRIVE A, RALEIGH (7/14/2004)
  • 4020 YADKIN DRIVE, RALEIGH (7/15/2004)
  • 12541 BURCHFALLS DRIVE, RALEIGH (7/22/2004)
  • 502 SOUTH WEST STREET, RALEIGH (3/2/2010)
  • 1513 ROARING RAPIDS ROAD, RALEIGH (7/27/2010)
  • 9209 PIPPIN ROAD, ZEBULON (1/31/2007)

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