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The Guide to the Week's Concerts

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This week's guide contains:

YES, PLEASE: Dennisfest; Wayne Hancock; By'r Lady; Dave Dondero

EH, WHATEVER: G. Love; The Cinematics; Midlake

VS.: Rebel Son vs. Weedeater

INTRODUCING: Violet Vector and the Lovely Lovelies

LAST WEEK'S PARTY: Charlie Louvin

SONG OF THE WEEK: Double Muslim's "Errors of Menace"



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YES, PLEASE

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09.01 DENNISFEST @ BULL CITY HEADQUARTERS

Former Street Sharks and outgoing Crossed Eyes and Cross Laws bassist Dennis Duffy is moving to Turkmenistan (immediately north of Iran and Afghanistan). His farewell party includes the last Cross Laws show and an essential collection of bands that Street Sharks and Cross Laws have encountered along the way: Highlights include the furied blitz of Raleigh's Double Negative and the rough-edged bounce of Crossed Eyes, who will soldier on post-Dennisfest with a new bassist. 7 p.m. —Grayson Currin

08.31 WAYNE HANCOCK @ HIDEAWAY BBQ

Shuffling to an old-fashioned country swing that goes back to Hank I and Lefty Frizell, Wayne Hancock's humble barroom twang may not be new, but it bears the mark of authenticity well. On the autobiographical "Shooting Star" from his latest honky-tonk gem, Tulsa, Hancock confesses "The interstate's my home." He's earned his laments. You can feel it. $12-$15/ 9:30 p.m. —Chris Parker

09.01 BY'R LADY @ THE CAVE

With slurred come-ons, late-night lyrics, wiry guitar hooks and a steady diet of all things Velvet, South Carolina's By'R Lady sounds a lot like The Strokes' long lost sibling: They've got a charming Southern flair, though, and who really cares if they recall Casablanca if they're this good, right? With Sleepsound. 10 p.m. —Kathy Justice

09.03 DAVE DONDERO @ DUKE COFFEEHOUSE

Dave Dondero's reedy, creaking tenor inspired a young Conor Oberst when Dondero fronted Sunbrain. Since their breakup in 1996, Dondero's itinerate folk-fueled spirit has given voice to "A Song for the Civil Engineer" and offered instructions for spreading his "Ashes on the Highway," all with the evocative, self-aware candor that's his trademark. $7/ 9:30 p.m. —Chris Parker

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EH, WHATEVER

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08.31 G. LOVE @ KOKA BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE

Philadelphia-bred G. Love fancies himself a multicultural conduit, channeling the Delta blues, R&B hooks and hackneyed rhymes about basketball and missing his "baybay" to a crowd who just wants to hear "Baby Got Sauce." Perhaps his most effective cultural transmission, though, was performing "Cold Beverage" (WMA, QuickTime) to a few hundred thousand 1999-style "hippies" at Woodstock III. That move certainly sold a lot of beer, which sums up G. Love's deal pretty completely. Tonight's tickets are $22.50, three dollars more than the list price for opener Ozomatli's excellent CD and DVD, Live at the Fillmore. Go to the record store and have a party every night. Go to the show and have fun—maybe—for an hour. Also, Slightly Stoopid. 6:30 p.m. —Grayson Currin

09.02 THE CINEMATICS @ LOCAL 506

Another cadre of gloomy kids from across the pond disinterring the jagged herky-jerky guitars and chiming melancholy swoon of British post-punk, The Cinematics arrive only to find the Editors already made off with Ian Curtis' legacy. Sure, there's some fire in their belly (the clanging "Break," for instance), but Scott Rinning's tortured Morrissey croon isn't nearly as depressing as the life-wasting déjà vu. $8-$10/ 9 p.m. —Chris Parker

09.05 MIDLAKE @ CAT'S CRADLE

While last year's The Trials of Van Occupanther is an improvement on the ramshackle pop of its debut, Bamnan and Silvercork, Midlake's languid if melodic sound hardly deserves the rabid press it's found. Like Joe Pernice, Midlake mines '70s soft rock. But The Pernices land Bacharach-ian baroque pop. Midlake: Fogelberg and America. $10-$12/ 9:30 p.m. —Chris Parker

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 31

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REBEL SON

From: Cary
Since: 2002
Claim to fame: 25 cuss words in 120 seconds

A jolt of fear runs through most people when they talk about Rebel Son, the Cary trio that uses its Southern pride as a marketing tool. Sure, the cover art for every Rebel Son album—released in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007—plays on the Confederate flag, and they riff (sometimes incorrectly) on history with titles like Articles of Confederation. But such fear is largely unfounded: This is blues-based, backwater rockabilly with its potency and profitability (they're one of the most popular bands here) in theater-of-the-Southern-absurd hyperbole. Constantly offensive, pretty harmless and mostly funny, frontman Lee Johnson sings about furious masturbation and unrequited love. 25 cuss words in 120 seconds? Rebel Son gets the joke. At LINCOLN THEATRE. $8/ 9 p.m.

VS.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1

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WEEDEATER

From: Wilmington
Since: 1994
Claim to fame: Puking/rallying

Like fellow statesmen Rebel Son, Wilmington's Weedeater makes its music with an ear for the extreme: If the name wasn't proof , the first 30 seconds of the second cut from God Luck and Good Speed should be. The poles of their sound—a mid-range, physical drone and a pummeling, iterative bass throb—rendezvous. Out of nowhere, frontman "Dixie" Dave Collins howls the song's only words—"Wizard ... fight"—and the cymbals come beating down. They manage hyperbole sans humor: When Collins sings "I wish I could be like you, blind, deaf and dumb all goddamn day," you won't laugh. To be taken aback and chuckle, see Rebel Son. To be taken aback and have a lump in your throat, see Weedeater. At LOCAL 506. $8/ 10 p.m. —Grayson Currin

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INTRODUCING...

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09.04 VIOLET VECTOR AND THE LOVELY LOVELIES @ LOCAL 506

"I realize that it's a really charming '60s idea to have a girl band," says Amanda Brooks. "But in 2007 it's not really relevant anymore. Still, I really wanted to work with other girls."

In the musical world that Brooks leads with her Chapel Hill quintet Violet Vector & the Lovely Lovelies, it's always 1967. Her vintage outfits, swiped from the vaults of Swinging London, and sunny demeanor embody romantic idealism, so it's no surprise that Brooks wanted a band that nailed a happy-go-lucky, '60s feel. Brooks' charming pop comes with plenty of percussion (bells, shakers, glockenspiel), hand-claps, call-and-response vocals and heavy hums of organ.

And while she wasn't able to fulfill her all-girl wishes when she moved to Chapel Hill, she compromised: The band's got three female voices and two dudes holding down the rhythm. Brooks knew the sound was as important as the look and concept, and that all three better be sharp. Mission accomplished. The band just signed to Holidays for Quince Records, and they're ready to get busy: "I love bubble-gum pop and I want to bring it back to the people," exclaims Brooks. "We're hitting you with sunshine, man!" With Au Revoir Simone and Oh No! Oh My! $8-$10/ 9 p.m. —Kathy Justice

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LAST WEEK'S PARTY

08.23 CHARLIE LOUVIN @ THE POUR HOUSE

Who knew Charlie Louvin, at 80, was such a wiseass? Thursday night in front of a small, reverent, largely seated crowd, he told jokes about guitar chords, drunk drivers and banjo players. His five-piece band included his son, Sonny, and Mississippi guitarist Bob Saxton. After Saxton queued one song in the wrong key, Louvin ribbed him all night, even offering him impromptu music lessons at several points. Jokes aside, Louvin and his band performed some two dozen songs, his intimate lows still clicking just fine with Brent Wilson's highs. —Grayson Currin

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