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In the galleries

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Artist, provocateur, and Indy tormentor Louis St. Lewis says he has entered the 21st century with his new work, on display at Gallery C in Raleigh beginning May 4. The exhibition, Clear Visions, includes painting and collage on Plexiglas, with rhinestones, crystals and holographic plastics embedded into the translucent surfaces ("Afro in the Sky with Diamonds," pictured). "For a long time, I appropriated or paid homage to artists of the past," Lewis told the Indy. "But in these new works I'm trying to think about what art of the future will be." Lewis' new pieces are less figurative and narrative than in the past. And because the painting surface is clear, a viewer can see the wall through the artwork, "so you never have to worry about whether it goes with your wall," he says half jokingly. Clear Visions runs from May 4 through June 12 at Gallery C. An opening reception for the artist will be held May 4, from 7 to 9 p.m. Call 828-3165 for details.

DiamondDiamondDiamondArtSource gallery in Raleigh is showing three North Carolina painters beginning May 3. Raleigh painter Mike Hoyt is joined by Charlotte painters Jim Chapman and Hale Trotter in a showcase of colorists. Sharon Tharrington, who directs ArtSource with Nancy McClure, says these artists were chosen for a joint exhibition because they use paint in similar ways despite employing very different subject matter. While Chapman paints still lifes, Trotter prefers landscapes, and Hoyt focuses on architectural structures, each uses paint in "a very luscious way," Tharrington says. "Jim Chapman employs a dramatic sense of color in his still lifes, with a lot of light and contrast, as does Mike Hoyt in his more architectural paintings," she says. "Hale Trotter's textural qualities are more subtle and softer, but the technique is similar." An opening reception will be held Thursday, May 3, from 7 to 9 p.m., and the exhibition will run through June 2. Call 833-0013 for details.

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