Ye Olde Archives » 8 Days a Week

Friday 6.12

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Ellen Williams
  • Ellen Williams

Raleigh
Broadway & Beyond: Songs from the Great American Songbook

Stewart Theatre, N.C. State Campus—Internationally touring soprano Terry Rhodes and mezzo-soprano Ellen Williams make a pit stop in Raleigh to join local music favorites David Lamb and the Wolves for a musical celebration of American song and operatic repertoires. Rhodes and Williams, perhaps most famous for their disc of duets covering memorable 20th-century song from the catalog of American popular tunes (To Sun, To Feast, and To Converse) will deliver tunes pulled straight from the catalog of great American composers alongside a fresh series of duets penned specifically for them. Catch this duo tonight at 8 p.m. for $20-25. Part of the Long Leaf Opera Festival. For more information, visit www.longleafopera.org. —Kathy Justice



Raleigh
Marbles Night at the Museum

Marbles Kids Museum—Do the exhibits really come to life after dark? Marbles Kids Museum wants you to find out. Spurred by the recent release of Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian, Marbles opens its doors for one night only to museum-going night owls of all ages. Appropriately enough, the evening begins with an IMAX Theatre screening of the new Ben Stiller flick, which also features amusing performances by Steve Coogan and Bill Hader, to entertain the adults. After the movie, parents and kids can explore all aspects of the museum from the Splash! water exhibit (maybe you'll see mermaids) to WorldTrek, where, if you're lucky, you'll hear a dead language come back to life. Online registration ends at 5 p.m. Thursday, June 11. Check-in begins at 6:45 p.m., with the film starting at 7:45 p.m. and playtime lasting until 11 p.m. Admission ranges from $14-$16. For more information, visit www.marbleskidsmuseum.org.—Sarah Ewald


Raleigh
Disney's High School Musical 2

Memorial Auditorium—So we're clear, North Carolina Theatre's latest production is a stage musical based on the sequel to a TV movie that became another stage musical. If you truly, truly want to feel old, acquiesce to the demands of your children and subject yourself to a bunch of toothless, forgettable songs about fitting in and working together, sung by acne-free 18-year-olds who, like 90210 before them, will inflict untold amounts of eating disorders and general insecurity upon kids wondering why they don't look like that once they hit puberty. This blurb might inspire some anger from Zac Efron fans or parents arguing for clean entertainment, but for God's sake, it's not like anything can stop this show from selling tickets. Perhaps High School Musical has created a new love of musical theater in the young generation, but that doesn't mean it's setting a good example. The performance runs through June 21; for more information, visit www.nctheatre.com. —Zack Smith


Raleigh
Charley's Aunt

Raleigh Theatre in the Park—Brandon Thomas' classic farce was a record-breaker for theaters when it was first performed in 1892, and it has remained a popular staple of the theater ever since. It takes the popular Elizabethan trope of cross-dressing (as men had to perform women's roles, plays often involved women disguised as men) and reverses it for a raucous tale of two Oxford gentlemen in need of a chaperone to entertain two lovely young ladies, and the aunt who doesn't show up on time. Disguises, hidden infatuations and many cases of mistaken identity follow. The performance runs through June 14 and June 18-21, closing out Theatre in the Park's 2008-2009 season. Showtimes vary; tickets are $13-$21. For more information, visit www.theatreinthepark.com or call 831-6936. —Zack Smith

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