Ye Olde Archives » MUSIC: Get Out

For the week of November 30 ~ December 6

Music worth leaving the house for

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Contributors: Grant Britt, Rick Cornell, Grayson Currin, Rich Ivey, Kathy Justice, Chris Parker, Chris Toenes

Thursday, November 30

Hail Punk featuring DJ Roxxi Dott, Kings

DJ Roxxi's MySpace page lets everyone know she's a true punk. Whether she's flicking off the camera, exposing her midriff or squatting naked with a record covering her crotch, the Los Angeles rocker doesn't take shit from anyone. She's a fan of such acts as Marilyn Manson, Snot and the Transplants. Does the old saying "Don't judge a book by its cover" apply to the Internet? 9 p.m. —RI

The Last Waltz Tribute Ensemble, The Pour House

Some 30 years ago, Bob Dylan, Neil Diamond, Muddy Waters, Eric Clapton, Joni Mitchell, Van Morrison, Emmylou Harris and many others took the stage to herald The Band's 16-year tenure. Scorsese stood by with a camera and turned out a classic rock documentary. But if you weren't alive in '76 and haven't seen the film, here's your chance to catch the show all over again—or, at least, a pretty close version—as the Atlanta-based Last Waltz Tribute Ensemble pulls the legendary performances off of the celluloid and onto the stage. Well, sans Neil Diamond cocaine nose candy, anyway. $10/ 9 p.m. —KJ

The Psychic Paramount, In the Year of the Pig, Nightlight

One of the most incinerating bands in the world, New York gargantuan trio The Psychic Paramount pounds harder than almost everybody. Straight noise caterwauls go headlong into psychedelic tours of fucked-up force, harded, louder and more piercing than anything Syd Barrett could have imagined. Are these guys from Japan? Would-be guitar heroes, please beware: This will change your perceptions. In the Year of the Pig will probably break something, and it will be awesome. $5/10 p.m. —GC

Dr. Powerful, Fistfight, White Rook, The Reservoir

Sanford isn't known for its left-field rock ... yet. Dr. P makes with the squirrelly time sigs and straight guitar play; half math, half dissonant ballads. G'boro's Fistfight weighs in with some shifty rhythm-based no frills stuff, and our own Rook cooks up the dark meat. Pass the hat/10 p.m. —CT

Craig Woolard Band, The Longbranch

If you know Craig Woolard was in The Embers, one of the preeminent shagging and beach music bands of all time, then you won't need coaxing. If not, know that Woolard and his band are some of the most polished in this tried and true genre, where dancing still means sharing a few carefree spins to some old good-time R&B. $10/ 7:30 p.m. —CT

Friday, December 1
Southern Culture on the Skids
  • Southern Culture on the Skids

Southern Culture on the Skids, Jule Brown, Lincoln Theatre

If only people could coexist as easily as the strains of blues, country, folk and rock in the music of these two bands, there'd be little need for law enforcement. SCOTS' humorous, fun-loving attitude tends to obscure the fine chops, but it all comes together in a spirited live show that's an area institution. Jule Brown work a groovy, rootsy vibe that splits the difference between Neil Young and the Band. $12-$14/ 9 p.m. —CP

Tiger Thief, Kings

With the flair of youth, at least one foot in the garage, and no fear of gigantic hooks ("Easy Easy Easy" turbo-thumps like Sweet—that is, the bubbleglam band, not Matthew), this Raleigh five-piece is making a name for itself. Or, in this case, a second name: Perhaps you knew these guys when they were called Iconic. 10 p.m. —RC

Chest Pains, Victory Factory, The Cave

Eventually, punk rockers have to grow older. They get married, have children, begin a career and maybe tell themselves they'll fuck the system from the inside. It's rare that a group of guys in Greg Barbera, Tim Ristau and Eric Hermann's positions would actually start a hardcore band, particularly one as blistering as Chest Pains. Thankfully for the younger Triangle punk scene, they did. Teenage rage is endearing, but middle-aged rage is petrifying. 10 p.m. —RI

Phon, Christy Smith (Nola) & Phil Cook (Megafaun), The Greenhouse

The Greenhouse (it's a green house, you see) hovering above Jackpot on Hillsborough Street is now a workspace for local artists and musicians. Painter Kristin Matwiczyk organized this one-night exhibition of work from several of the space's occupants and friends, including Casey Porn, Paul Friedrich and Chris Plankers. All money from the sale of a piece goes directly to its creator. Nola's Christy Smith will play a set, as well as experimental duo Phon. 6-10 p.m. —GC

Saturday, December 2

Dom Flemons, The Cave

As a member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Dom Flemons makes like a claw-hammered bandit, stealing the souls of the old-time Southern banjo pioneers as he threads his five-string syncopation through the Drops' string-band synergy. But as a solo artist, Flemons is more avant than ancestral, mixing bits of blues, jazz and country amidst his signature old-time repertoire. "I always like to keep the audience guessing," says Flemons. Free/ 7:30 p.m. —KJ

Kings Garage Sale, Kings

Records or discs or beers or bottles or photos or paintings or clothes or earrings: For the second year, Kings turns the rock club into a shopping mart, giving its denizens a chance to pawn both their wares and unwanted belongings to friends and strangers (1-5 p.m.). At 9 p.m., Grey Young takes the space back into clubland. 1-5 p.m. Tir Na Nog's regular Rock 'n' Shop Market happens on Blount Street at the same time. —GC

Amy LaVere
  • Amy LaVere

Amy LaVere with Lynn Blakey, Hideaway BBQ

Though bold and brassy on the big screen as Wanda Jackson in the Johnny Cash flick I Walk the Line, Amy LaVere is soft and sultry on record. But there's plenty of punch in her performance. Her vocals are given a boost by her percussive upright bass thumping. She's all over the place genre-wise, too, with zydeco, country, torch, jazz and rock, but with LaVere as a guide, you won't get lost, or bored. $10-$12/ 9 p.m. —GB

The Bravery, Radio 4, Lincoln Theatre

Neither act wins points for originality. Radio 4's thin, nervy slashes of guitar and dub-inflected, rhythmic skitter reached an apogee on 2002's Gotham! just as every Brooklyn band discovered the same box of new wave and Gang of Four albums. An over-produced follow-up (Stealing a Nation) and general dance-punk oversaturation make their modest comeback, Enemies Like This, largely irrelevant. The Bravery are more "of the moment," combining a similar sonic signature with a British-inflected sadsack croon that owes residuals to Robert Smith. $10/ 9 p.m. —CP

Tuesday, December 5

Maritime, Kings

At the moment, nowhere is fame more whimsical than in indie-variety guitar pop. Ask Milwaukee's Maritime, who have been triumphantly perking at the buzz-band line for at least three years now. Alas, their excellent release this year on Flameshovel Records, We, The Vehicles, has been virtually ignored. While thousands of kids sing along nightly to Nada Surf songs about fruit flies, it seems like these dudes couldn't catch a break at a DJ convention. Oh, well: That just means I'll have to sing along to "Calm"—totally awesome, big, slicing guitars splitting hairs down into gauzy, partial arpeggios—a bit louder. $8/ 9:15 p.m. —GC

Wednesday, December 6

Cinemechanica, Oranges Band, Places to Live, Kings

Trying to polyrhythmic with a rock band can be troublesome, but Cinemechanica give it a fair shake, aligning their herky jerks with some angsty tones that sound more like DC than their home of Athens, Ga. The Oranges go more directly to the jugular: supple pop backed by a solid rock backbone. 10 p.m. —CT

Geno Delafose & French Rockin' Boogie, Hideaway BBQ

Geno Delafose is a real working cowboy. He's also a second-generation musician, carrying on the traditions of father John's music. But if you're two-stepping to this cowboy's tune, you'd best step lively. Delafose is a Creole cowboy, and his rollicking Zydeco-influenced music rocks hard. Mixing blues, soul and rock with traditional Cajun/Creole fare, Delafose creates a spicy gumbo that heats the feet. $16-$18/ 8 p.m. —GB

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