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Eight Days a Week

The daily guide to life in the Triangle

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Wednesday
Raleigh
Graceland/Asleep on the Wind
Kennedy Theatre

Ellen Byron's Graceland/Asleep on the Wind, the second production in the Hot Summer Nights at the Kennedy series, tells two stories centered around Elvis. The first concerns two die-hard fans camping outside Graceland in order to be the first subjects in the King's holy temple. The second story, which takes place in a world before Graceland, finds two siblings in a "special place" deep in Louisiana. Performances are at 8 p.m. and run through June 26. Tickets are $35; call 834-4000 or go to hotsummernightsatthekennedy.org. --Jon Ross

The End of Suburbia
Colony Theatre

Ready for doomsday? It's closer than we think, according to experts marshaled in The End of Suburbia: Oil Depletion and the Collapse of the American Dream. Beginning as documentary about the unsustainability of auto-dependent development, the film moves into darker terrain when oil experts start talking. The film will screen at 7 p.m. at the Colony Theater on Wednesday, June 22. For those with bicycles, theater manager Denver Hill will be leading a group ride over to the theater. Muster your bikes at Whitaker Mill and Glenwood at 5:30 p.m.--David Fellerath

Thursday
Raleigh
Agent Orange with 2-Step, Discopunk and Ragga Mashup DJs
Berkeley Cafe

This "electro-punk mash-up" offers an entire evening dedicated to different ways to get hyped. Different sounds in different rooms is nothing new to dance clubs, but having a classic punk rock headliner such as Agent Orange opens a beachhead to a new audience. 2-Step, Discopunk and Ragga Mashup are also on tap, which is another way of saying be prepared for some aggressive, high-energy beats. Beats drop at 9 p.m.; cover is $10. --Chris Parker

Friday
Raleigh
Stacey Earle & Mark Stewart
The Pour House

Stacey Earle doesn't need any fancy industry label for her music, which she describes simply as Stacey Earle music. "It's a journal," she says, "written basically about my life." After big brother Steve took her along on tour in '90, she decided on songwriting for a living. Earle, who admits to playing guitar continuously, is a self-described melody seeker. "Then I find words to it, and I'm just basically telling what happened that day. I call it the people's music." The show begins at 8 p.m.; tickets are $10. --Grant Britt

Durham
Jambalaya Soul Slam
Hayti Heritage Center

Slamming as a literary genre may be hard for some people, but participants in the Jambalaya Soul Slam know how to work it. Event organizers are trying to establish a team of poets to compete against regional and national foes, and will use this event to harvest talent. For the $10 entry fee, slam hopefuls can either watch or grab a mic and participate. The theme is erotic poetry, so keep the kiddies at home. The event starts at midnight at the Hayti Heritage Center.

Saturday
Raleigh
Les Primitifs du Futur
N.C. Museum of Art

Nostalgic sounds direct from Paris permeate Raleigh this weekend, care of dancehall ensemble Les Primitifs du Futur. Formed in 1986, the band boasts an energetic je ne sais quoi with a side of French sultriness. The ensemble performs before a screening of Sylvain Chomet's animated film The Triplets of Belleville. Tickets are $10, and children get in free. The music starts at 8 p.m. --Jon Ross

Durham
Thyrday
Marvell Event Center

A roll call of some of the area's brightest celebrates the release of The Thyrday's Perfection Xperiment 2. Look for a video shoot, giveaways and the deft old-school spinning of DJ Bro-Rabb amidst a troupe of MCs that includes Killa K, J Gunn, K Slack, Shelly B, Kaze and L.E.G.A.C.Y. Tickets are $8 for this 8 p.m. show at 119 W. Main St. --Chris Toenes

Sunday
Carrboro
The Evens
Artscenter

Sage Francis insists that he goes to Fugazi shows requesting Minor Threat songs, which leaves me with no idea as to what he will request at an Evens show. The new duo of D.C. high-roller Ian MacKaye and former Warmers drummer Amy Farina create a jangly, lo-fi, crooked-smile pop that should make even the most rabid hardcore fan start tapping that foot. And long live Ian MacKaye's insistence on cheap tickets for the kids: This show runs $5, even though most would gladly pay $20. It starts at 8 p.m. --Grayson Currin

Blue Ribbon Bluegrass and BBQ
Tyler's Parking Lot

This is the fourth year for Tyler's annual outdoor bluegrass show and cookout. This year, the bill includes Big Fat Gap, Rex McGee and the LeRoy Savage Group. All ages are welcome. The fun starts at 3 p.m. and goes to 10 p.m.

Monday
Durham
Watermarks
Carolina Theatre

While the seeds for a second world war were being planted, the Austrian-based swim team Hakoah was tearing apart the competition. Formed before the first war in response to a ban on Jewish athletes, the club only accepted Jewish members and, during the 1930s, boasted one of the best women's swim teams in Austria. For his documentary, director Yaron Zilberman brought members of the team back to their old stomping grounds. Watermarks is the winner of many awards and was an official selection of the 2005 Jewish Film Festival in New York.

Chapel Hill
Something About Vampires and Sluts
Local 506

Myrtle Beach, S.C.'s Something About Vampires and Sluts rely on synth-heavy jangle pop with a lot of reverb tainted with '80s Cure/Robert Smith vocals to fuel their resurrection of new wave androgyny. Intertwining Goth and punk makes for strange bedfellows but an interesting stage show. Get your teeth out at 10 p.m.; show is free. --Grant Britt

Tuesday
Chapel Hill
Transportation
The Library
Ah, Transportation, how do I love thee? Is it for your scruffy, shoe-shuffling charm? Maybe the familiar lilt of your melodies, which pour forth as if your amps were time-traveling AM receivers picking up a signal from 30 years ago? Remember the way music back then shone with an inner light and didn't just sparkle off the glow of its candy-coated cover? Is your ragged rock swagger just a cover for your pure pop instincts? And why do you tease me, keeping me waiting on your album? Rock at 10 p.m. for 2 bucks. --Chris Parker

Wednesday next
Raleigh
Dave Matthews Band
Alltel Pavilion

It's an amphitheater-sized shame that some of Dave Matthews' best songs in years come on his band's least-cohesive album yet. The piano ballad "Out of My Hands" beautifully tackles a tense Thom Yorke emotional vertigo, while the Dr. John swamp-step "Louisiana Bayou" thumps with Tom Waits weirdness like few tunes from this Charlottesville quintet ever have. But the Mark Batson-helmed Stand Up is largely folly. There's no such reason to lament over The Drive-By Truckers, though--unless, of course, you're sad you'll be dropping $59.50 (plus that Ticketmaster pocketbook plundering) to hear their big guitars render even bigger tales of Southern wanderlust and downfall. Show starts at 7 p.m. --Grayson Currin

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