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in loaded guns

Two of the six acts in our Indy Music Awards shortlist for Best New Rock Band play the third-annual WKNC DOUBLE BARREL BENEFIT this year at KINGS in Raleigh. DeYarmond Edison--four Wisconsin expatriates who moved to Raleigh in 2005, not long after self-releasing their exquisite sophomore album of acoustic crackle on a soul pyre--sits in the middle of the bill on Friday, Feb. 3. There's also the retro-fitted The Capulets, TV Knife (imagine late Flaming Lips sweetness reset with early Flaming Lips guitar freak-outs) and The Dynamite Brothers,a breastbone-rattling, souled-out rock duo. Our band for Saturday is A ROOSTER FOR THE MASSES, whose dance-punk could serve as an apropos anthem for a needed revolution. They're paired with the three-piece guitar distention of Raleigh's Trousers and two Athens bands--quirk-math masters We vs. the Shark and Albini disciples Cinemechanica. Admission each night is $5 for a 9 p.m. start. For more, see, and if you like what you hear, vote at --Grayson Currin

in just 35 years ago

In January 1971, black students in Wilmington announced a boycott of the city's public schools in response to the hostility that marked the desegregation of the schools. Oxford native and future NAACP executive director Ben Chavis led the boycott that eventually resulted in firebombed businesses, openly armed Klansmen patrolling the streets, snipers firing on firemen, and an armed standoff between several black students and the local police. WE REMEMBER THE WILMINGTON TEN--35 YEARS LATER is a commemoration that will feature a panel discussion with journalists, writers and participants (Ben Chavis included) in the historic event. The program will take place at 7-9 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 3 at the SONJA HAYNES STONE CENTER FOR BLACK CULTURE AND HISTORY on the campus of UNC-Chapel Hill. For more information, call the Stone Center at 962-9001.

in American thinkers and seers

The language in IMAGINING AMERICA: ICONS OF 20TH-CENTURY AMERICAN ART is jargon-free and sophisticated at the same time. This unconventional approach to art history reaches out to those who know their Basquiat, Rauschenberg and Warhol but haven't necessarily written a dissertation on them.

Co-author JONATHAN FINEBERG of the University of Illinois School of Art and Design will discuss the book this week in a series of free events sponsored by the Lucy Daniels Foundation. On Friday, Feb. 3, UNC'S FRIDAY CENTER in Chapel Hill will screen the accompanying PBS documentary and host a Q&A with Fineberg. Call 962-3000 for details. He'll give a talk called Motherwell's Mother, about the work of the great expressionist painter, on Saturday, Feb. 4 at 3 p.m. at the LUCY DANIELS FOUNDATION in Cary. Call 677-9888 ext. 123 to register (recommended). And at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5, Fineberg will present Anxiety and Innocence, on art as a mechanism of visual thinking, at the N.C. MUSEUM OF ART in Raleigh. Call 839-6262 for details.

in Dr. Funkenstein's Alive

It's party time. And, in his own words, "Ain't no party like a P-Funk party, cause a P-Funk party don't stop!" GEORGE CLINTON isn't kidding. The Godfather of Funk is hitting the stage in Raleigh in his 40th year of touring, now with his own label, The C Kunspyruhzy, and a new album, How Late Do U Have 2BB4UR Absent? The double CD set, released last year, is the first album with new studio material since the Parliament Funkadelics 1996 release of The Awesome Power of a Fully Operational Mothership. If you're feelin' groovy and you're hot for singers with multi-colored dreds and bassists with tight shiny pants, hit up the
LINCOLN THEATRE on Saturday, Feb. 4 at 9 p.m. for a long night of urban-and-extraterrestrial-based soul, rock and funk. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door.

In capital-s soul

When THE DAP-KINGS, "the world's mightiest funk and soul revue," take the stage, you'll find yourself eyeing the nearest calendar to check the year. They've got horns, two cool-breeze guitarists dressed in old-school matching suits, and an emcee to bring out frontwoman SHARON JONES. The Brooklyn-based, Augusta, Ga.-raised Jones radiates excitement in a way that makes you think of belt-it-out artists of the '60s and '70s, transforming whatever club that she and the Dap-Kings are gracing into a stop on the so-called chitlin circuit. Stutter-stepping guitars and staccato horns are topped off by Jones' gospel-funk vocals, stopping on a dime to make way for a genuine Southern soul ballad and then reloading for the sweatiest take on a Woody Guthrie song that you're ever going to shake to. On Thursday, Feb. 2, the revue hits KINGS. at 9 p.m. $10 ($12 at the door). --Rick Cornell

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